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PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 9:24 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Aloha!

I've been playing the uke for quite a while now, and I've been carving a lot longer than that. And for some reason it never occured to me, until recently, that I could combine the two talents and build my own ukuleles.
Eventually, I got up the nerve to try it. To my surprise it turned out pretty well! Oh sure, I made a ton of mistakes along the way, and I even fixed a couple of them. But, when all is said and done, I have a very playable uke and a good working knowledge of what it takes to make a real ukulele. Here is the thread concering that first uke build: Ukulele #1

So now, of course, I'm hooked on this and I've been slowly getting the equipment together and doing all the research it takes to equip my workshop for uke building.
The whole process is really much more involved that I thought it would be. And since I want to make a serious attempt at making instruments professionally, I thought I would invite you all to hang out with me during my uke build #2.
That way, you all can see what goes into the process of making a uke from scratch. And should you decide you would like one, you will know exactly what you are getting.

So, here goes...

The first uke I built used a wood kit with pre-sawn lumber. This time, however, I will be using my own wood and cutting it down to size. I have the wood I need for the neck, but I am still waiting for the rest of it to arrive in the mail.
That's ok though, because there are a ton of jigs that I need to build to make sure everything goes smoothly.
Image
First, I made photo copies of my plans and cut out the outlines of the sound board (the top of the uke), and the back board. I then sprayed the backs of the copies with adhesive and fixed them to a piece of 1/8" birch plywood.
I carefully cut out the shapes with my bandsaw and sanded the edges smooth. Then, using a drill press, I drilled tiny holes at the ends of the places where each tone bar will go. (I will explain all of this later, but the tone bars help transfer the vibrations from the bridge to the rest of the sound board)

When the rest of the wood comes in, I will be using these templates to accurately mark and trace the locations of everything that needs to be attached to the insides of the uke.
Here is what they look like:
Image
That's all I have for tonight. Tomorrow I will be working on more jigs.

Thanks for looking, and please, ask a lot of questions!

~Fink


Last edited by Finkdaddy on Fri Dec 23, 2011 9:55 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 12:38 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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As a fellow uke player I can't wait for the next installment!

On that template is that the sound hole toward the top near the neck?
What wood are you planning on for the body?
Solids or Lam's?
Soprano, Concert or Tenors?

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 5:15 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Beach Bum Scott wrote:
As a fellow uke player I can't wait for the next installment!

On that template is that the sound hole toward the top near the neck?
What wood are you planning on for the body?
Solids or Lam's?
Soprano, Concert or Tenors?

Yes, the sound hole is not it the "traditional" spot. Most instruments use Fan-Bracing, with the sound hole in the middle. This transmits about 5% of the string vibrations into sound. The rest actually converts into heat. An instrument actually heats up as you play it.
I want to specialize in something called Kasha-Bracing. In the 1960's, a scientist named Micheal Kasha designed a classical guitar for his son. The new style bracing transmits about 8% of vibration into sound, giving it a louder volume, more sustain, and a wider spectrum of tone.
When I add the tone bars to the sound board, I will go into a bit more detail about that.
I'm going to make the sound hole slightly smaller, and maybe a different shape too, because I am also going to add a sound port which is another hole on the side that faces the player.
Please note that if you are looking at the template above, everything you see is in reverse because the sound board will get flipped over when it gets glued to the sides. That gave me major headaches on my first uke because I wasn't thinking of it the right way.

I will be building a tenor scale using all solid woods. The sides, back, and neck will be quarter-sawn Hondurian Mohagany, and the top will be Engleman Spruce. I wont be doing any fancy binding or inlay on this one, other than a logo, because I want to be able to price it to sell.

I wish I had more pictures to show you today, but I got a cord of firewood delivered and I spent all day unloading and stacking it.
And now it's time to watch the Brewers destroy the Cards, and then the Packers destroy whoever it is they're playing!


Last edited by Finkdaddy on Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:26 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 8:33 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Can't wait to watch this thread!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:03 pm 
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Sooo dumb question, where do you get your wood for building the uke?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:37 am 
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Nounou Moai
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KilikaPez wrote:
Sooo dumb question, where do you get your wood for building the uke?

Not a dumb question at all.
There are several companies that specialize in tone wood for instrument building, such as Notable Hardwoods, Hawaiian Hardwoods, LMI, etc. They offer quality wood that has been harvested, cut, and dried with the luthier in mind.
I got the wood for my neck blanks at a local place called Kettle Moraine Hardwoods. The rest of the wood I am purchacing from a shop in Hawaii called Hana Lima 'Ia. They specifically deal in ukulele building. That way I can order wood that is rough sawn to the dimensions that work for the uke and it comes in perfectly flat and ready to use. Also, the man who runs the shop, Asa, is a stand-up guy who is friendly and helpful with decades of experience.
Unfortunately, it takes forever to ship wood from Hawaii, which is why I'm in a bit of a holding pattern for a couple of days here.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:16 pm 
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Finkdaddy wrote:
KilikaPez wrote:
Sooo dumb question, where do you get your wood for building the uke?

Not a dumb question at all.
There are several companies that specialize in tone wood for instrument building, such as Notable Hardwoods, Hawaiian Hardwoods, LMI, etc. They offer quality wood that has been harvested, cut, and dried with the luthier in mind.
I got the wood for my neck blanks at a local place called Kettle Moraine Hardwoods. The rest of the wood I am purchacing from a shop in Hawaii called Hana Lima 'Ia. They specifically deal in ukulele building. That way I can order wood that is rough sawn to the dimensions that work for the uke and it comes in perfectly flat and ready to use. Also, the man who runs the shop, Asa, is a stand-up guy who is friendly and helpful with decades of experience.
Unfortunately, it takes forever to ship wood from Hawaii, which is why I'm in a bit of a holding pattern for a couple of days here.


ahh Kettle Moraine, I haven't heard that name in a while (I'm originally from West Bend, WI)

so you are just ordering the wood and not a kit from them? (I see they have a kit listed but looks to be out of stock)

Very cool write up- thanks for taking the time to put it on-line can't wait to see more


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 9:28 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Alright, a fellow Wisconinite!! I spent many a drunken band practice up in West Bend. I'm originally from Grafton, but now I live in Waterford.
Hana Lima's kits aren't really kits in the typical sence of the word. They are simply all the wood you would normally buy in a typical uke build. The wood is beautiful, aged and quarter-sawn to rough dimensions.
Usually, they only have mohagany in stock for sides and backs, and cedar or redwood for tops.
I would have bought their kit for this build, but they don't have any necks in stock, so there are no kits available.
They have a very nice uke building school on site, so the kits are actually made for students, and any extras are sold online.

This is all I had time for tonight. The first pic is of the rough board I bought from the local shop, and the bottom is the same board cut into quarters and planed down to about 3/4". I'm hoping to get 3 necks out of that stock.
Image
Image
The next step will be to add the headstock angle and glue on the heel pieces.

Later folks!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:56 am 
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Matato'a
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Lookin good Fred. Let me know when you decide to build a surf guitar. :lol:

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:08 am 
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Nounou Moai
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Riptide wrote:
Lookin good Fred. Let me know when you decide to build a surf guitar. :lol:

:shock: That's a great idea!! I will let you know. 8)
Seriously, someday we will talk about this. Start thinking of designs for your one of a kind 'Riptide' guitar!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 12:19 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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What Tiki would make a good guitar body? Maybe a Moai? Maybe even the FOM Moai? Just thinking.


C of DnC

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 2:25 pm 
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I actually have been considering building a moai upright bass, or a tiki shaped slide guitar. It's got to be doable!

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 4:26 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Saturday morning! God, that was a long week.
The next step on the neck was to cut a 15 degree scarf joint. This creates the break angle of the headstock.
I created a jig that fits into the top of my table saw. It has a fence glued to the base at a 15 degree angle. Then all I have to do is measure and mark where I want the blade to cut and then cut away!
Image
Image
In the next picture, you can see that I cut and glued together 3 short sections of the mohagany that are going to create the heel of the neck. You'll see what I mean later. I also took the two pieces I created with my neck scarf jig and laid them together so that I could sand the angle cut flat and smooth.
Image
This is how they will look when I flip the smaller piece around into position. I was just testing the joint to make sure it all fit tightly.
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I created a neck scarf clamping jig so that I could easily clamp the pieces together. Because of the angle, the two pieces want to slide apart when you clamp them, so this way the pieces are held on the ends and in the middle before I clamp the sides.
Image
I thought I should mention that there are only certain types of glue you should use. The type I'm using is Titebond wood glue. It is very strong and does not allow for "cold creep". Most glues, when put under stress for long periods of time, will slowly slide even though it is dry. Titebond wont to that.
Image
Right now the scarf joint is drying, so I'll get into more of the neck later on.
Also, the rest of my wood should arrive tomorrow, so I'm very excited about that! :thumbsup:


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 7:49 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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I wish I had more time for this. I've been working late every night, so by the time I get home it's time to get ready for bed! :x
Oh well, there are worse problems to have I suppose.

In these two pics I've glued the heel/head block to the neck. I will be making a spanish style neck. So, it doesn't attach separately to the body. The neck design is incorporated into the build of the body. This makes a very strong connection and helps transmit vibrations from the neck to the body. The downside is that it makes construction fairly tricky and I imagine repairs would be harder too. The vertical line you see is where the sides of the body will attach to the neck.
Image
Image
These are the bookmatched pieces of spruce that will become the sound board. In spite of the wood being feather light, it has a very dense and straight grain, making it relatively strong.
Image
I made a clamping jig for them out of some straight pieces of maple and 3/4" ply wood. The back side of the jig is rigid, and the front side is the two pieces of maple. One is clamped and the other sits in between the first and the spruce. Then I taped in a few wedges to press the glued edges of the spruce nice and tight. Then I placed a weight on top while it dried for an hour or so to keep it from popping up. The newspaper underneith is to keep the spruce from becoming a perminent piece of the jig!
Image
Then, after I took it out of the jig, I propped it up over night to dry so air could circulate around the wood.
The next morning I sanded both sides smooth where the glue line was to remove the dried glue and level any differences between the two glued boards.
Then I used the template I made earlier to trace my outline and mark where the tone bars are to be placed.
The line you see drawn outside of the template lines will be where I will rough cut the wood with my bandsaw.
Image
Remember that the side you are looking at will be the inside of the uke, so everything will be reversed from what you see.
Next I will be glueing together the wood for the back of the ukulele, but Ghost Hunters is about to start, so I'll have to do it between commercials! :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 9:26 am 
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Nounou Moai
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It's Sunday morning and I have a killer sinus headache. This time of year is really bad for my allergies. :(

Anywho, I've skipped a bit ahead here, so let me tell you where I'm at.
I glued together the bookmatched halves of the back, the same way I did the front. Then I cut out the rough shape of the uke with my bandsaw.
Before I could do any work to the sound board I needed to add the sound hole to it. I thought that it would look rather plain, so I wanted to add a rosette. I traced 3 different sized ovals onto the front of the soundboard. Then I carefully routed out the rosette grove with my dremel and then made a rosette ring out of some leftover mohagany. The ring was then glued into place, and when it was dried I sanded it flat and cut out the actual soundhole by drilling a bunch of tiny holes around my oval line, and then taking the rest out with my dremel.
Image

I flipped the soundboard over and added a sound hole patch to give the hole more strength and to help keep it from cracking in the future. Since I am going to add a sound port to the side of the uke, you will be able to see the insides of it quite easily. So, I am taking care to make everything look smooth and purdy on the inside too.
Image

A bridge patch was then added to give the top more strength when the string tension is applied to the bridge.
Image

Then I glued in two center grafts along the line where the two bookmatched sides were glued together. This will prevent the top from spitting along this line.
Then, one by one, I created the tonebars and glued them in. Special care is taken to remove as much wood as possible from the bars while still maintaining it's structural integrity. The idea is to add as little weight as possible, since you don't want to inhibit the vibrations from the bridge.
Image

And here is the step all finished up.
Image

Now I am going to work on the back of the uke, and then some more neck work.
Later folks! :thumbsup:


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 7:41 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Here is the back plate all put together.
Image
I adjusted my table saw blade to an angle of 3 degrees and cut in a groove, on either side of the neck, right where the 14th fret will be going. This is where the bent sides of the uke will connect to the neck.
Image
Now it's time to start shaping the heel.
I took advantage of the shape of my table saw blade to help rough in the heel. This is a trick I learned in a Hana Lima book and saved me a ton of frustration compaired to my last build.
Image
A quick, round cut on the bandsaw helps shape the heel's profile.
Image
Then I measured and cut in the neck taper. This was tricky because there was no way to keep the neck flat on my table saw.
But somehow I mangaged to get it done without any damage to my fingers.
Image
Then here I finished the whole neck profile with the bandsaw.
Image
I then clamped the neck to my bench and began the arduous task of shaping the neck. I've been using files, rasps, and a drum sander up until now. But I think I will have to invest in a spoke shaver. It seems like that would work better that what I'm doing now.
Image
Here's a shot of the heel basically finished. But by the end it will need a ton of sanding, ad nauseum, and it's all end grain, so it is not my favorite thing to do.
Image
Then, lastly, I glued on two extra "ears" to the headstock. This gives the headstock more width, and it hides the scarf joint that I put in earlier.
Image
Sorry for the long posts.
There is a lot to do yet, so stay tuned!

~F


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 12:29 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Now that the headstock is all dry I created a template out of a thin piece of plywood and traced the shape and the peg hole locations onto the bottom of the head in pencil. I wont cut it out yet, because eventually I will glue on a piece of spruce veneer to the front made from leftover wood from the sound board.
Image
Now I will begin to shape and bend my sides. But first there are some jigs to make again, so it's back to the shop.
Image
Later Gator!


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 12:53 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Love that headstock design!


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 1:05 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Thanks Granite! I plan to mimic that shape at the bottom of the fretboard too.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 2:29 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Cool! Some people call it the Gumby look, but I prefer to call it the Bob's Big Boy Hair Design.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 2:46 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Oh man, why did you tell me that? Now I'll have to redesign it because I will never get that image out of my head! :cry:


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 2:50 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Don't you dare!!!!!


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 3:02 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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:lol: I'm just kidding anyway. I actually wanted something that reminded me of waves. And besides, Gumby is one of my all time favorites. And so is Big Boy, so it all works!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:23 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Here's a few update pics. I probably should have documented these steps better, but I keep forgetting to take pictures while I'm working. :oops:

One of the most important parts of the building process is the bending of the sides. I have litteraly lost sleep over the anxiety of having to do it. It seems so unnatural and difficult, but honestly, some research, preparation, and patients are the biggest things.
I decided to continue with hot pipe bending (there's a joke in there somewhere, I think), the same way I did the last one. It's a tried and true method, and one that has been done by luthiers for hundreds of years.
Basically, I planed down the sides to about 2mm. In hindsight, they should probably be about half that thickness. Live and learn I suppose.
Then you take a small length of pipe (I used a 12" piece of fence pipe) and heat it up. I used a small propane torch to accomplish this. The pipe is at the right temp when you throw water on it and it dances around for a bit before evaporating.
After soaking the sides in warm water for about 5 minutes, you place the wood on the hot pipe and slowly apply pressure. You can feel when the combination of heat and steam make the wood pliable. While I'm working I spray fresh water on the wood as it's drying out. There is a bit of a learning curve involved, but it doesn't take long to figure it out.
Image
Here is the first side completed. While it is still wet I place the side in the mold you see at the top of the pic and clamp it down to dry over night.
Image
While my sides were drying, I completed the profile of my neck.
Image
When the sides were complete I glued the two tail ends of the sides together and also to the tail block. The tail block gives the sides, top, and bottom more surface to connect with, making a stronger uke.
Then I fit the sides into the slots of the neck that I created earlier. Thin wedges of wood are used the create a tight fit between the sides and neck. No glue is used here to hold the two together. The top and bottom will supply more than enough strength at the neck. This is done so that if there needs to be repairs in the future, the neck can be removed more easily.
Then everything is placed in a jig so that the neck, sides, and tail are all aligned to the center.
Image
While in this jig I will be adding the kerfing. This is a long strip of wood with vertical slots cut along it's length to make it flexable. This is glued in to the top edge of the sides. This will give the top and bottom boards an area to be attached to.
Image
That's where I'm at now.
Stay tuned, there's much more to come!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 8:01 pm 
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Nounou Moai
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Well, I'm finally getting to the part where it is starting to look like something.
Each of the kerfings have now been installed. It sort of looks skeletal to me.
Image
I don't have a picture of it, but I then took a piece of plywood that was wider than the uke and about 2" wide and wrapped it in 100 grit sandpaper. I used it to sand the edges of the sides perfectly flush with the kerfings.
Once that was done I created a jig to hold down the sound board tight to the sides while I glued it down and let it dry overnight.
Image
When that was dried I used my sanding drum to sand off the rough edges of sound board and then I spent a lot of time sanding it smooth by hand. Not fun.
Image
Then I cut out the side port. This was interesting since the side is round. I traced out the oval on the side, then drilled a bunch of holes just inside of my lines. I then used a small dremel bit to finish cutting out the hole. Then, of course, I sanded and sanded.
Image
Right now I have the back clamped on and drying and I will go through the whole process again tomorrow morning.
Of course, my swiss cheese memory and my tendancy to rush things bit me here. I should have glued in a label to the inside of the back before I glued it on. Now I will have to carefully install it to the back through the tiny side port after it's all dry.
Perhaps that's better though, since I haven't really designed a final label anyway.
While that's drying, I think I will work on the fretboard for a little while.

Time for another High Life. :wink:


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