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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 8:17 pm 
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Matu'u
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Personal Statement: Conch ceviche.
Does anyone know when sticking googly eyes on dried blowfish and shoving a light bulb in them started? Was it a secondary use for dried fish that had another purpose?

-Rev

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:28 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Nets with shells and sea-stars predates my memory. It was a suburban Los Angeles bathroom theme circa 1960. The parrot and porcupine fish must have come over on the same boat as the sea stars and Conch shells.

Back then, they shoved light bulbs into everything. I am surprised that Trigger and Bullet didn't get blow molded and electrified.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:02 am 
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Fellow Moai
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They may not have stuffed Trigger with a light bulb, but Robert Redford definitely was.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:26 am 
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Avai Rona
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I found an article online in the Scientific American, April, 1920, pg. 323 that says:

"Fig. 2 is reproduced from a photograph of this puffer-fish lantern and Is taken from Dr. Townsend's article on "The Puffer, Its Defense by Inflation,"published in the Bulletin of the New York Zoological Society for March, 1916, page 1331.
In this article Dr. Townsend further says:
"It is a common practice with the Japanese to make lanterns of inflated and dried puffers by cutting out the back as shown in the accompanying photograph of a puffer 'lantern' in the New York Aquarium. A candle suspended by a wire serves as a light which shows as brightly through the stretched skin of the fish as through a piece of oiled paper."

Sorry, I cannot add the photo but here is a link to the article on Google Docs: Scientific American, April, 1920

OZ :fez:

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:01 am 
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Matu'u
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Personal Statement: Conch ceviche.
Nice GoogleFu there, Oz!

So that does explain why there would have been a ready supply of dried fish for people to use in decor in the 20th century. Now.... I wonder how long it was a practice in Japan before then?

-Rev

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:53 am 
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Avai Rona
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rev_thumper wrote:
Nice GoogleFu there, Oz!

So that does explain why there would have been a ready supply of dried fish for people to use in decor in the 20th century. Now.... I wonder how long it was a practice in Japan before then?

-Rev


Interesting question. I'll keep researching.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2017 11:23 am 
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Avai Rona
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Still researching this but I did come across a Haunted Puffer Fish Lamp on Critiki.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:46 pm 
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Avai Rona
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A little more on the Chochin...

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JAPANESE LANTERNS
The chochin, the Japanese paper lantern, with its tasteful daintiness, its defenceless frailty, contrasts interestingly with the solid utilitarianism of the western metal-framed lantern. This child of the Japanese mode of living and Japanese taste plays a popular role in their everyday life. Not to speak of the Japanese All-souls' Day, which is sometimes called the lantern festival, on occasions of various court ceremonies, of flower-viewing parties or of parades demonstrative of joy or some public events, this paper lantern is an indispensable requisite.
A chochin is now made of ribs of split bamboo shaved to an extreme thinness. Gowa, or lantern paper, covers this frame; the paper is strengthened with oil. The top and bottom are usually made of chipped wood, and the bottom piece has a metal stick in the center to hold a candle. It is mostly globular or cylindrical in shape, and collapsible as it is pleated along the ribs.
The origin of the chochin is not definitely known. The first lantern is supposed to have been imported from China; it was made of the headbone of a fish. The paper lantern, however, was invented by the Japanese. In a story narrated in the romance Akinoyomonogatari, the "Autumn-nights' Tales," is recorded the fact that a lantern made of a skeleton head of a fish was used in the reign of Emperor Gohirikawa (1222-1232). It was called "Gyono-no-chochin" and is presumed to have come from China. This was made of the headbone of aouo, a blue-colored fish resembling a carp. This headbone was made semi-transparent by boiling to obtain the framework of a lantern. In the story above mentioned, the lover lighted his path by the pale light from fireflies collected in this translucent fish lantern.
Down to the middle of the Ashikaga period (about the beginning of the Fifteenth Century) the chochin was not in common use. The an don, a paper-covered lightstand, and the torch were the providers of light for the populace. During the Temmon period (Sixteenth Century) the kago-jochin, the basket lantern, made its appearance. The usual size was about two feet high, and a half a foot in diameter, and it was cylindrical in shape. In the center of the bottom case was fixed a bamboo piece, which fitted into the socket at the lower end of a candle. Candles in those days were made of resin exuded from the pine-tree.
The collapsible paper lantern appeared first in the Tensho era, late in the same century. In the time of Taiko Hideyoshi, the hakojochin, the box-lantern, was used among aristocratic people. The top and bottom case were made of rattan braidwork. Those made of chipped wood appeared during the Keicho era (1596-1614). Then the brilliant era of Genroku greatly fostered the development in the direction of artistic craftsmanship of articles in daily use. Following the aesthetic demands of luxurious aristocratic families and rich people, lantern-makers vied with one another to produce lovelier lanterns. The result was the attainment of great excellence in the manufacture of lanterns, as attested by specimens handed down to us.
Among some of the curiosities of chochin still in use, the most interesting is perhaps the fugu-jochin, the swell-fish lantern. It preserves ingeniously enough the very form of the fish when swollen to its full extent.
For a summer night's amusement, boys and girls, like children in America at Hallowe'en, often make a grotesque lantern of a watermelon, hollowing out its contents. This method is often applied to a mad-apple or other smaller melons. The dainty bonbori, though it rather belongs to the family of light-stands, is a charming illuminant indispensable in beautifying Doll Festivals.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:15 am 
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Honui Moai
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Youtube: Begin Japanology, season 3 episode 5, Light

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:28 pm 
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Honui Moai
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I'm guessing this did not pre-date electric light.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 3:12 pm 
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Honui Moai
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I LOVE that "Begin Japanology" series!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 1:02 pm 
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Avai Rona
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pappythesailor wrote:
I'm guessing this did not pre-date electric light.

Actually, they did...there are a couple of articles about Japan and the South Seas in the early 1900's using candles to illuminate the pufferfish. They gave a more diffuse glow to the areas they were placed in.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:03 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Edo period (1615-1868), maybe.

http://www.lasieexotique.com/mag_illuminations/mag_illuminations.html

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:19 pm 
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Honui Moai
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Quite interesting, and something I was just pondering the other day. Thanks for your input, fellas!


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